The Poor Man’s Analyst

LuHud Pinch Hitter

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Sorry for the lack of posting recently. I’ve been extremely busy, and will be for the next several weeks. I’m not sure how often I’ll be updating this blog, but I’m continuing with my one post per week at Statistically Speaking. Once the season starts, I’ll definitely continue regular posting.

Anyway, I contributed a guest post to the LoHud Yankees blog, run by Yankees beat writer Pete Abraham. The post can be found here. I wrote about evaluating trades and transations and such, and pretty much told the LuHud community (indirectly) to stop being so stupid and ignorant (but in a nice way).

Written by dcn29

January 31, 2009 at 12:41 AM

Posted in Uncategorized

Those Left Behind

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Just put up a new post on StatSpeak about some remaining members of the current free agent class. This includes Nomar, Pudge, Frank Thomas, and Jim Edmonds. I swear I set the post to go live at midnight tonight, but obviously something went wrong with that. No big deal. Anyway, here’s a link to the post if you’re interested.

Written by dcn29

January 22, 2009 at 3:44 PM

Posted in general baseball

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Joe Posnanski is the man

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That’s pretty much the thought that goes through my mind every time I read another one of his blog posts. I’m sorry for the lack of updates recently, I’ve been incredibly busy with rush week and the fraternity stuff, and now classes just started back up again. I have StatSpeak stuff to work on that I haven’t had time to tend to either, so I’m not only neglecting the Yankee fans out there.

But I’d like to pass along this Joe Posnanski blog post, as I feel it is relevant to being a rational fan. No team, not matter the resources, can operate to perfection. There will always be mistakes, whether they are made at the time or turn out to be mistakes down the road. If a team had just one perfect year ever, they’d be set for a long, long time. In this post, Posnanski shows what just one perfect draft would look like. Suffice to say, the team would be pretty stacked.

One draft. Of course, no team gets all the draft picks right. No team gets half the draft picks right, or one-third, or one-quarter or even one out of every twenty right. But it’s possible. If the Royals had just been right three times in 1999 — if they had only drafted, say, Lackey, Peavy and Pujols — what would their history have been like? And this is why, at the end of the day, teams like the Royals and Pirates and Reds and Twins and Marlins and Rays and all the rest have every chance to succeed in this crazy game. If you are right on the draft, really right, you can beat every team out there no matter how many billion they might spend.

Written by dcn29

January 20, 2009 at 2:57 PM

Posted in general baseball

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From the Archives: Evolving the Save Rule

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This week is, and will continue to be, incredibly busy for me. It’s the middle of rush week, which means I’m out all day and night shmoozing with frat brothers, judging my interest in their house and trying to make them interested in me. So it’s pretty much a bunch of guys man-flirting with each other. But I digress…

This edition of From the Archives is a post from David Pinto of Baseball Prospectus about changing the save rule in baseball. The rule has changed a few times throughout history, and as a result has more than a few quirks. There are people out there, myself included, that wonder why the guy coming in in the 7th inning with the bases loaded and up by one doesn’t get the save, while the guy coming in in the 9th with no one on and his team up by 3 runs does. I know the guy in the 9th got the save, but which one really “saved” the game? It’s an interesting read, even if his proposal would never happen in reality. See the link above.

Written by dcn29

January 14, 2009 at 9:46 PM

Posted in Bullpens, From the Archives

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Something New

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In case you didn’t notice, there’s a new theme. WordPress was annoying me with the different blog layouts and how restrictive each one was. I had been fighting with that green one for a while, trying to get it to organize the blogroll, and trying to add other widgets. So instead of having a sub-par blog viewing experience, I decided to go with a different look. With this new look also comes more fun things in the side bar. Check over to the right side of your screen and you’ll now see categories for the links in the blogroll, a recent comments section so you can quickly check if anyone responded to a comment of yours, and that little bubble (the subtitle) in the top right that says “Just another WordPress.com weblog.”

Well with the old theme, the page didn’t display a subtitle for the blog, so I never bothered to make one. Now that it has one shown, the fact that it says “just another…” is annoying the crap out of me. So if you, the readers, would like to have an enhanced role in this blog then feel free to contribute ideas for a subtitle in the comments section of this post. Or if you really don’t like this new look, let me know and I can look for something else that works. I’m not going back to the green and black look, it was just too annoying to deal with.

I hope someone comes up with a good one, or anything really, so that I don’t have to come up with something on my own that’s guaranteed to be un-funny and awkwardly worded. Fire away.

Written by dcn29

January 12, 2009 at 3:26 PM

Posted in asides

Much Ado About Money (What else?)

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A number that journalists have liked to toss around this off-season is $423.5 million. That’s the total amount of money the Yankees committed to CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett, and Mark Teixeira this winter, in an attempt to fill the holes in the club, partially caused by the departures of Mussina and Giambi. Keep in mind, the Yankees aren’t paying them all of that money in one season. In fact, the 2009 payroll will be lower than the 2008 figure. That little tid bit is often glossed over, for whatever reason. That hasn’t stopped people from complaining. Brewers owner Mark Attanasio said this in an e-mail to Bloomberg News:

“At the rate the Yankees are going, I’m not sure anyone can compete with them. Frankly, the sport might need a salary cap.” (source)

In response to that, I give you this. Also against the Yankees free spending ways is Astros GM Drayton McLain, saying, “We would love to have a salary cap, but the (players’) union has been very resistant to that.” As a way to curb the Yankees’ free spending ways, a salary cap would seem to do the trick. But would it? Yes, the Yankees couldn’t spend whatever they wanted and afford to cover up whatever mistakes they make (a certain Carl Pavano comes to mind). But other than hurting the Yankees, how does it help the poorer teams? Why do the Brewers and Astros care what the Yankees do? By my count, those two teams play the Yankees a combined ZERO times next season. So how would curbing the Yankees spending somehow help the Brewers and Astros? I have no idea. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by dcn29

January 11, 2009 at 3:06 AM

Posted in general baseball

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Sorting out the Rotation

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I was talking to my dad this past week about the state of the Yankees pitching staff. You see, my dad is one of those pessimistic Yankee fans, although not nearly as pessimistic as Steve Lombardi. Side note: That post right there got me banned from Was Watching. Talk about letting criticism roll off your back.

Anyways, as I was saying…according to my dad it’s a virtual lock that Burnett will get hurt this year, and I can’t really blame him for that. So with the Yankees already not having a reliable fifth starter, and Joba having an innings cap this year, there’s reason to worry about where the remaining innings will come from. What he doesn’t realize is that it’s extremely rare for any team to have good starting rotation health all season, and every team relies on starters at some point that Joe Fan hasn’t heard of. Let’s use the Red Sox, who had the third best starters ERA (4.02) in the American League this past season, as an example. The Red Sox top 4 starters—Beckett, Matsuzaka, Wakefield, and Lester—pitched a combined 733.1 innings, compared to 966.2 total from everyone combined. That’s a difference of 233.1 innings. Keep those numbers in mind. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by dcn29

January 10, 2009 at 6:49 PM

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